Recent Storm Damage Posts

Tips For Your Car In Winter Months

12/19/2018 (Permalink)

Driving in the colder months can bring its own set of challenges, depending on where you live.

The days are getting shorter and the weather is getting colder, making driving conditions a little trickier.

With all the holiday travel you’re sure to be doing, it’s important to make sure you have the right emergency supplies in your car.

The most important items to have are things that will keep you warm, like gloves, wool socks and hand warmers.

Blankets are great to have on hand. If it’s really cold, you can use them to insulate your car – putting them in the windows helps prevent the cold air from getting in.

And make sure you have a cellphone charger and a flashlight with extra batteries.

Cold weather maintenance is also important.

AAA has a list of tips to ensure your car is in good running order when temperatures drop, including:

  • Making sure the battery is in good condition and clear of corrosion
  • Checking tire treads and installing snow tires where needed
  • Confirming that all lights and signals work
  • Verifying that brakes are in great working order

Taking care of your car can mean the difference between life and death on the road

Story by: CNN

Preparing For Winter Weather Storms

12/15/2018 (Permalink)

Winter storms create a higher risk of car accidents, hypothermia, frostbite, carbon monoxide poisoning, and heart attacks from overexertion. Winter storms and blizzards can bring extreme cold, freezing rain, snow, ice, and high winds. A winter storm can:

  • Last a few hours or several days;
  • Knock out heat, power, and communication services; and
  • Place older adults, young children, and sick individuals at greater risk.

IF YOU ARE UNDER A WINTER STORM WARNING, FIND SHELTER RIGHT AWAY

  • Stay off roads.
  • Stay indoors and dress warmly.
  • Prepare for power outages.
  • Use generators outside only and away from windows.
  • Listen for emergency information and alerts.
  • Look for signs of hypothermia and frostbite.
  • Check on neighbors.

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A WINTER STORM THREATENS:

Prepare NOW

  • Know your area’s risk for winter storms. Extreme winter weather can leave communities without utilities or other services for long periods of time.
  • Prepare your home to keep out the cold with insulation, caulking, and weather stripping. Learn how to keep pipes from freezing. Install and test smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors with battery backups.
  • Pay attention to weather reports and warnings of freezing weather and winter storms. Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.
  • Gather supplies in case you need to stay home for several days without power. Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication. Do not forget the needs of pets. Have extra batteries for radios and flashlights.
  • Create an emergency supply kit for your car. Include jumper cables, sand, a flashlight, warm clothes, blankets, bottled water, and non-perishable snacks. Keep the gas tank full.
  • Learn the signs of, and basic treatments for, frostbite and hypothermia.

Content by: https://www.ready.gov/winter-weather

Snow Blower Safety Tips

12/10/2018 (Permalink)

During this time of season snow blowers are popular, but it's safety is a big deal if you are not careful. 

If you are using a snow blower, you should watch out for items on your property that can jam up the snow blower. Some common items are doormats and pet toys. 

When you are running a snow blower be sure you are not wearing any loose clothing. It's important to always wear tight clothing to prevent any accidents.

Most importantly never put your hand in the front end of the snow blower to remove items. That rule still applies when the machine is not moving, because there is tension on the belt. You can remove items by using a stick or a broom.

Owner of Kirkwood Ace Hardware, Jeff Hinz, says it's better to be safe than sorry.

"We see a lot of people with snow blower injuries and it's generally fingers and digits from the front. If you check any type of medical site you will see that snow blowers are a major cause of injury during the winter. Always stay behind the machine, wear shoes with a good grip so you don't slip and fall," Hinz said.

These are just a few tips to make your experience with a snow blower a good one. 

Tips provided by myndnow.com

Do's and Do Not's of Storm Emergencies

12/10/2018 (Permalink)

Heavy thunderstorms are known to cause flooding both inside and outside of the house. Here are a few tips of what to do if your house has flooded during this storm season.



What To Do After Flooding

  • Wipe excess water from wood furniture after removal of lamps and tabletop items.
  • Remove excess water by mopping and blotting.
  • Place aluminum foil or wood blocks between furniture legs and wet carpeting.
  • Remove and prop wet upholstery and cushions.
  • Turn on the air conditioning for maximum drying during the summer months.
  • Remove art objects to a safe, dry place and remove colored rugs from wet carpeting.
  • Gather loose items from the floor.

What NOT To Do After Flooding

  • Do not leave books, magazines or other colored items on wet carpet or floors.
  • Don’t leave wet fabrics in place. Hang furs and leather goods.
  • Don’t use your household vacuum to remove the water.
  • Do not turn on ceiling fixtures if the ceiling is wet and avoid being in rooms where the ceilings are sagging.
  • Do not use the your television or other household appliances.

Content by: SERVPRO Corporate